Tuesday, 27 July 2010

The Clarke, Bloor and Disney families of Derby

Image © and collection of Brett Payne Image © and collection of Brett Payne
Frederica Eliza Clarke and Frederica Muriel Clarke
Cabinet portraits taken c.1885-86 and c.1886-88
at the studio of W.W. Winter of Derby
Images © and collection of Brett Payne [1,2]
 
The young woman and child shown in the two cabinet cards from the studio of W.W. Winter, both of which featured in my previous post here on Photo-Sleuth, are identified sufficiently on the reverse to deduce who they are: Frederica Eliza Clarke née Disney (1857-1939) and her eldest daughter Frederica Muriel Clarke (b. 1883).
somersetheraldbadge
Badge of the Somerset Herald
Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons


Frederica Eliza Disney was born in early 1857 at Lambeth or Brixton in Surrey, where her father Henry Cathrow Disney (1826-1896) worked as a customs clerk.  Henry was, in turn, the eldest son of James Cathrow (c.1792-1854), who had taken on the surname of Disney during his four decade-long tenure as Somerset Herald, an officer of arms at the College of Arms in London and member of the Royal Household [3,4].  Two years after the death of his father, Henry had married Emily Evans from Cardiganshire, and after Frederica, they were to have a further three sons: Henry Charles Cathrow Disney (1858-1906), James Cathrow Disney (1860-1934) and Charles Cathrow Disney (1867-1941). (5,6)

Image © and courtesy of Picture the Past
Morley Park Ironworks, c.1870s
Unknown photographer
Image © and courtesy of Picture the Past [7]

Some time between April 1861 [8] and April 1863 [9], Henry Cathrow Disney became the proprietor of the Morley Park Ironworks near Belper in Derbyshire [9], although the family only appear to have moved to live there around 1868 or 1869. [10]  The 1871 Census describes Henry, living with Emily, their youngest son and two servants at Morley Park, as an ironmaster employing 210 men and 61 boys, as well as occupying 144 acres of farm land, on which a further 4 men and a boy were employed. [11]  This was a substantial operation, obviously requiring a large amount of capital, as well as considerable managerial and financial skills.  In fact, these particular ironworks had provided work for the men of Heage for almost two hundred years.  Frederica and the two other sons remained at boarding school in Lambeth. [12,13]

morleypark2
Morley Park Ironworks, 9 September 2009
Image © Alan Murray-Rust and courtesy of Geograph.co.uk
Licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons License [14]

By April 1873, when Frederica was sixteen, she was also living at Morley Park.  A report in The Derby Mercury describes her as presiding over a stall at a well patronized charity bazaar raising funds for the Heage parish church and National School. [15]  The ironworks business too was in need of supplementary income, as evidenced by the advertisement for the sale of 36 acres of land (The Stripe Farm, Denby) by Henry Cathrow Disney in September the previous year. [16]  In early 1874, however, resurrection of the financial situation proved to be impossible, and he was declared bankrupt.

Mr. H. Cathrow Disney, of the Morley Works, near Belper, has failed for 17,000l.  The works consist principally of two blast-furnaces, and it is not unlikely that the estate will turn out tolerably well. [17]

The family probably moved to Leeds shortly afterwards, where Henry was employed as a clerk at another unknown ironworks [18], and where on 10 May the following year Frederica was married to Thomas Clarke (1845-1904), a corn factor and maltster from Derby. [19,20]

Image © and courtesy of Robert Silverwood
The “Disney boys,” c.1894-1896
Henry Charles Cathrow and Charles Cathrow Disney
Cabinet portrait by Frederick J. Boyes of Derby
Image © and courtesy of Robert Silverwood [21]
 
Frederica went to live in Derby with her husband and it appears that, between 1881 and 1887, her parents and at least two of her brothers did, too.  Certainly in 1887 Henry Disney was listed as resident at 3 Friary street, Derby [22], and by April 1891 he was working as a “maltster’s manager,” presumably for his son-in-law, Thomas Clarke. [23,24]  Henry Cathrow Disney died at his home, Friary Villa, Derby on 21st November 1896 at the age of 69. [25]
 
It was possibly around this time that two of his sons visited Frederick J. Boyes’ studio on Osmaston Road to have their portrait taken, a copy of which (see above) is now in the collection of Robert Silverwood [21].  Henry’s widow Emily Disney continued to live in Derby [26] until her death in 1914. [27]
 
arboretumsquare
Arboretum Square, Derby
Image © and courtesy of Derby City Council
 
In the mean time, Frederica and her husband Thomas Clarke had settled in a house – number 7 - in the fashionable Arboretum Square [28,29], located at one of the four entrances to Derby’s Arboretum, England’s first public park. [30]


Genealogy of the Clarke, Bloor and Cathrow Disney families
(click image for larger JPG or here for PDF file)
 
Thomas was born and had grown up in Derby, his grandfather, also Thomas, having arrived there with his parents from Lincolnshire around the turn of the century. [4]  That Thomas Clarke (1783-1832) had established himself in the corn trading and malting business, with premises on Nottingham road, a short distance to the north-east of Derby’s centre. [31,32]  When he died at the relatively young age of 49, his wife Mary Clarke née Moore (1794-1860) continued to run the business [33,34] until their eldest son Thomas Clarke (1817-1879) was of an age where he could take over the reins. [35,36]
 

Sarah Elizabeth Clarke née Ramsbottom (1828-1893)
Carte de visite portrait by W.W. Winter of Derby, taken c.1880-1883
Image © and courtesy of Derby Local Studies Library [37]
 
Frederica’s father-in-law (the “second” Thomas Clarke) was married at Heanor, Derbyshire on 11 May 1844 to Sarah Elizabeth Ramsbottom (1828-1893), daughter of Edward Ramsbottom of Liverpool, and grand-daughter of Robert Bloor of Derby. [4,38]

The Derby China Works, c.1780s
Image from Bemrose (1898) courtesy of Archive.org [39]

I will digress here because Sarah’s maternal grandfather Robert Bloor, and her husband Thomas Clarke, both played small parts in the history of Royal Crown Derby china, that product which has perhaps most been responsible for making the town of Derby known around the world.
 
imari
Crown Derby Imari plate
Image © George Le Gars and courtesy Wikimedia Commons [40]
 
Robert Bloor (1778-1846) was born in the village of Church Gresley in South Derbyshire [41], but moved to Derby after his marriage to Sarah Gilliver (1776-1844) in 1799. [6,42]  The Derby China Manufactory, after having been started six decades earlier by John Heath, André Planché and William Duesbury, had been built up by successive owners William Duesbury II, Michael Kean, William Duesbury III and W.E. Sheffield. [43]  When in 1815 Robert Bloor leased the business, he had already been working there as a salesman and clerk for some years.
 
Bloor was a shrewd business man and art lover who knew the business well. The company began designing brightly coloured Japanese Imari patterns and new artists were hired as the company set about restoring its former reputation. He borrowed heavily to support the business but restored it to its former high position. [44]
derbychinaworks
Old China Works, Derby, undated
in Keys, John (1895) Sketches of Old Derby and Neighbourhood,
courtesy of Revolutionary Players [45]
 
Bloor may have lacked the artistic background of his predecessors … but the factory was never without talented artists and much fine work was produced under the Bloor regime. There is every reason to believe that he was well aware of the traditions he had succeeded to and endeavoured to maintain the high standard. [46]
2 
Royal Crown Derby coffee can, c. late 1820s
Bloor mark used from c.1825
Image © Nathan Antonucci and courtesy of Montreal Antiques [47]
 
Sadly Robert Bloor’s mental health deteriorated, and he was unable to take an active part in the business from around 1828 onwards, the firm being entrusted to James Thomason, who had been manager since October 1815. [48]
 

China Works, Nottingham Road, Derby, 1817
from Magna Britannia by Lysons [49]
 
Depending on which source you read, Thomas Clarke was either responsible for a valiant, but ultimately unsuccessful, attempt to salvage the china works from a state of neglect and bad management [50], or instigated a statute of lunacy against his wife’s grandfather after the latter’s wife had died, to gain control of the firm, but had no interest in the business itself. [51] Whatever the real truth about Clarke’s intentions, an inquisition was held into Bloor’s mental state in early October 1844, resulting in the following verdict:

That it is the opinion of this Jury, that Mr. Robert Bloor is of an unsound state of mind, and incapable of managing his business, and has been so since the 26th of Feb. 1828. [48]


Bloor plate, c.late 1820s
Private Collection [52]

Robert Bloor died on 11 March 1846 at Hathern, Leicestershire, where he had been cared for over the previous sixteen years, aged 68.  His wife Sarah lived to the respectable age of 86, only dying in February 1852, Derby. [53,54,55]  Repeated efforts were made by James Thomason and Thomas Clarke to find someone to purchase or rent the china works, to no avail, and finally in February 1849 it was announced that china manufacture would be discontinued. [51] The plant, stock, moulds and materials were eventually sold to Boyle & Sons of Fenton, while the buildings were demolished, bringing an end to almost a century of production at the Nottingham Road china works. [56]

Image © and courtesy of the Derbyshire Archeaological Society Nottingham Road, Derby, 1852
Image © and courtesy of the Derbyshire Archeaological Society [57]

The land was sold to two Catholic priests, a convent was built there by Reverend Thomas Sing of St Mary’s, and by 1852 it was home to the Sisters of Mercy, with a day school for 70 children, evening classes for factory girls, a large Sunday school, an orphanage, a training programme for domestic servants, a public laundry and, in the following year, a girls’ boarding school.  Sixteen nuns from the convent attended the sick and wounded at Scutari during the Crimean War. In 1862, since the convent had become unhealthy, the convent moved to more appropriate premises [58], the land was purchased by the Midland Railway Company and the buildings demolished in 1863. [59]

Image © The Ordnance Survey and courtesy of Alan Godfrey Maps Nottingham Road, Derby, 1899
Image © The Ordnance Survey and courtesy of Alan Godfrey Maps [60]
 

This was the same year that Thomas Clarke senior was elected and served as Mayor of the Borough of Derby. [61]   They had moved with their ten children from Nottingham Road, presumably in a house adjacent to the extensive malthouses and grain storage buildings which formed the core of the family business [60], to Pear Tree House in Litchurch. [62]  Thomas died in 1879 from a “lingering illness.” [50]

By the time Thomas Clarke junior’s daughter Muriel was born in 1883 [63], he appears to have been in control of the business. [64]  It also transpires that he employed his father-in-law Henry Disney, who moved from Leeds to live at 3 Friary Street, Derby before 1887, as a manager of the maltworks. [22,61]  Between 1878 and 1898, Thomas and Frederica had thirteen children, five sons and eight daughters. [5,65]  By 1899, the business had expanded considerably, with additional premises in Derwent street east and Fox street. [66],  The Clarkes had moved a number of times, to Matlock Bath in 1888 [67], to Scarborough in 1895 and then back to Derby in time for the April 1901 Census, which shows them living in [65].

Frederica’s father died in 1896 [25], her husband in 1904 [68] and in 1911 she was living in Mickleover with five of her children.  Frederica Eliza Cathrow Clarke née Disney died at Stratford in 1939, aged 81.  The fate of her daughter Muriel is unknown.

-----------------------------------------

Derby resident Nigel Aspdin – a keen photo-sleuth himself, as regular readers of this blog will know - has very kindly cycled around the western end of Nottingham Road to look for any remnants of the buildings which made up and surrounded the china works, convent, granaries and malthouses in the 18th and 19th centuries.

Image © and courtesy of Nigel Aspdin Cottages on Nottingham Road, Derby, 18 July 2010 
Image © and courtesy of Nigel Aspdin [70]


These two cottages on the north side of what is left of Nottingham Road, situated between Wood and Alice Streets, are possibly the only buildings remaining from the early to mid-19th Century.  Nigel suggests that they may even be remnants from the late 18th Century.  The old china works were almost certainly situated immediately to the west of these cottages, currently occupied by the sports grounds of the Landau Forte College.

Image © and courtesy of Nigel Aspdin
Cottages on Nottingham Road, Derby, 18 July 2010
Image © and courtesy of Nigel Aspdin [70]


The gable outlines preserved by the fresher brick colours on the west facing wall of the cottage, as shown in Nigel’s picture above, are conceivably those of the Sisters of Mercy convent.

Image © and courtesy of Nigel Aspdin Possible former malthouse on Alice Street, Derby, 18 July 2010 
Image © and courtesy of Nigel Aspdin [70]
 

Most of the malthouses appear to have been replaced by buildings which form part of the Liversage Charity Estate, built in the mid- to late 1890s.  However, there is a large building at the northern end of Alice street, the northern (above) and eastern walls (below) of which show some features suggesting that it could once have been a malthouse.

Image © and courtesy of Nigel Aspdin Possible former malthouse on Alice Street, Derby, 18 July 2010 
Image © and courtesy of Nigel Aspdin [70]
 
On the north-facing wall a series of four, equally spaced rectangular concrete insets can be seen, each three brick courses high and at a high of about two metres.  It is possible that these were formerly where large internal timber cross-beams were set into the walls, acting as joists or supports for the malting floor.  Three similar insets can be seen in the right-hand part of the east-facing wall, at a similar height, half way up and between the ground floor windows.

Image © and courtesy of Nigel Aspdin Overlay of 1899 OS map on 2006 aerial photo
Image © Ordnance Survey and courtesy of Alan Godfrey Maps
Image © Infoterra Ltd & Bluesky and courtesy of Google Earth

It is possible, therefore, that the existing building, outlined above in red from a 2006 aerial photo [71], was formed by the amalgamation of two former malthouses shown on the 1899 Ordnance Survey map [60].
 
Acknowledgements
 
Many thanks to Nigel Aspdin for once again setting forth armed with bicycle and camera in search of clues on my behalf, for his excellent photographs of buildings, for permission to reproduce the image of his Bloor plate, and for his thoughts on many aspects of the story told here. I am also grateful to the Derby Local Studies Library, Alan Murray-Rust and Robert Silverwood, for permission to reproduce images.

References

[1] Winter, W.W. (n.d.) Cabinet portrait of Frederica Eliza Clarke (1857-1939), Derby, c.1885-1886, Collection of Brett Payne.

[2] Winter, W.W. (n.d.) Cabinet portrait of Frederica Muriel Clarke (b. 1883), Derby, c.1885-1886, Collection of Brett Payne.

[3] Anon (2010) Somerset Herald, Wikipedia article [Accessed 20 Jul 2010].

[4] Howard, Joseph Jackson & Crisp, Frederick Arthur (eds.) (1897) Visitation of England & Wales, Volume 5, England: College of Arms, Courtesy of Archive.org [Accessed 20 Jul 2010].

[5] General Register Office (GRO) Index to Births, Marriages & Deaths, from FreeBMD [Accessed 20 Jul 2010].

[6] International Genealogical Index (IGI), from FamilySearch [Accessed 20 Jul 2010].

[7] Photographic print of Morley Park Ironworks, c.1870s-1880s, unknown size and format, © Derby Museum & Art Gallery Ref. DMAG001030, courtesy of Picture the Past, . [Accessed 20 Jul 2010].

[8] 1861 Census, 1 Lee Cottages, Cowley Road, Lambeth, Surrey, England, National Archives Ref. RG9/360/41/13/77, UK Census Collection 1841-1901, from Ancestry.co.uk [Accessed 20 Jul 2010].

[9] Anon (1863) Petty Sessions, April 15, The Derby Mercury, 22 April 1863, 19th Century British Library Newspapers, Courtesy of Gale CENGAGE Learning [Accessed 20 Jul 2010].

[10] Harrod, J.G. & Co. (eds.) (1870) Postal and Commercial Directory of Derbyshire, Leicestershire, Rutland, and Staffordshire, Second Edition, London & Norwich: J.G. Harrod, courtesy of the University of Leicester’s Historical Directories [Accessed 20 Jul 2010].

[11] 1871 Census, Morley Park, Heage, Derbyshire, England, National Archives Ref. RG10/3588/21/1/3, UK Census Collection 1841-1901, from Ancestry.co.uk [Accessed 20 Jul 2010].

[12] 1871 Census, 4 Angell Park Gardens, Lambeth St Mary, Surrey, England, National Archives Ref. RG10/687/59/40/174, UK Census Collection 1841-1901, from Ancestry.co.uk [Accessed 20 Jul 2010].

[13] 1871 Census, 10 Wiltshire Road, Lambeth, London, England, National Archives Ref. RG10/688/59/38/152, UK Census Collection 1841-1901, from Ancestry.co.uk [Accessed 20 Jul 2010].

[14] Photograph of Morley Park Ironworks, 9 September 2009, by Alan Murray-Rust, © Copyright Alan Murray-Rust and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

[15] Anon (1873) Heage, The Derby Mercury, 23 April 1873, 19th Century British Library Newspapers, Courtesy of Gale CENGAGE Learning [Accessed 20 Jul 2010].

[16] Anon (1872) Advertisement, The Derby Mercury, 9 October 1872, 19th Century British Library Newspapers, Courtesy of Gale CENGAGE Learning [Accessed 20 Jul 2010].

[17] Anon (1872) Trade of Derbyshire, The Derby Mercury, 26 August 1874, 19th Century British Library Newspapers, Courtesy of Gale CENGAGE Learning [Accessed 20 Jul 2010].

[18] 1881 Census, 83 Caledonian Road, Leeds, Yorkshire, England, National Archives Ref. RG11/4534/88/23/139, UK Census Collection 1841-1901, from Ancestry.co.uk [Accessed 20 Jul 2010].

[19] Marriage Registration: Thomas Clarke & Frederica Eliza C. Disney, 2nd Qtr 1876, Leeds Registration District, Vol 9b Pg 564, General Register Office (GRO) Index to Births, Marriages & Deaths, from FreeBMD [Accessed 20 Jul 2010].

[20] Anon (1876) Births, Marriages & Deaths, The Derby Mercury, 17 May 1876, 19th Century British Library Newspapers, Courtesy of Gale CENGAGE Learning [Accessed 20 Jul 2010].

[21] Boyes, Frederick Joseph (n.d.) Cabinet portrait of Henry Charles Cathrow Disney (c.1858-1906) and Charles Cathrow Disney (1867-1941), Derby, c.1894-1896, Collection of Robert Silverwood.

[22] Kelly, E.R. (ed.) (1887) Kelly’s Directory of Derbyshire, London: Kelly & Co., republ. on microfiche by the Derbyshire Family History Society.

[23] 1891 Census, 3 Friary St, Derby St Werburgh, Derbyshire, England, National Archives Ref. RG12/2731/135/36/229, UK Census Collection 1841-1901, from Ancestry.co.uk [Accessed 20 Jul 2010].

[24] Kelly, E.R. (ed.) (1891) Kelly’s Directory of Nottinghamshire, Leicestershire & Rutland, and Derbyshire, London: Kelly & Co., republ. on microfiche by the Derbyshire Family History Society.

[25] Deaths: Henry Cathrow Disney, The Times, Tuesday, Nov 24, 1896; pg. 1; Issue 35056; col A, The Times Digital Archive 1785-1985, Courtesy of Gale CENGAGE Learning[Accessed 20 Jul 2010].

[26] 1901 Census, 122 Green Lane, Derby, Derbyshire, England, National Archives Ref. RG13/3218/86/2/8, UK Census Collection 1841-1901, from Ancestry.co.uk [Accessed 20 Jul 2010].

[27] Death Registration: Emily Disney, aged 80 [sic], 2nd Qtr 1914, Derby Registration District, Vol 7b Pg 651, General Register Office (GRO) Index to Births, Marriages & Deaths, from FreeBMD [Accessed 20 Jul 2010].

[28] 1881 Census, 7 Arboretum Square, Litchurch, Derby, Derbyshire, England, National Archives Ref. RG11/3401/61/14/68, UK Census Collection 1841-1901, from Ancestry.co.uk [Accessed 20 Jul 2010].

[29] Anon (2009) Arboretum – History, Derby City Council web site [Accessed 20 Jul 2010].

[30] Harris, Christopher (n.d.) Derby Arboretum, England’s First Public Park, 1840-2010 web site [Accessed 20 Jul 2010].

[31] Anon (1828) Pigot and Co.’s National Commercial Directory for 1828-29, London & Manchester: J. Pigot & Co., courtesy of the University of Leicester’s Historical Directories [Accessed 20 Jul 2010].

[32] Glover, Stephen (1829) The Directory of the County of Derby 1827-9, Derby: Glover,courtesy of the University of Leicester’s Historical Directories [Accessed 20 Jul 2010].

[33] Anon (1832) Advertisement: In the late Mr. Thomas Clarke’s Affairs, The Derby Mercury, 23 May 1832, 19th Century British Library Newspapers, Courtesy of Gale CENGAGE Learning [Accessed 20 Jul 2010].

[34] Anon (1835) Pigot and Co.’s National Commercial Directory, London & Manchester: J. Pigot & Co., courtesy of the University of Leicester’s Historical Directories [Accessed 20 Jul 2010].

[35] 1841 Census, Nottingham Road, Derby St Alkmund, Derbyshire, England, National Archives Ref. HO107/199/17/54/16, UK Census Collection 1841-1901, from Ancestry.co.uk [Accessed 20 Jul 2010].

[36] Anon (1842) Pigot and Co.’s Royal National and Commercial Directory and Topography, London & Manchester: J. Pigot & Co., courtesy of the University of Leicester’s Historical Directories [Accessed 20 Jul 2010].

[37] Winter, W.W. (n.d.) Carte de visite portrait of Sarah Elizabeth Clarke née Ramsbottom (1828-1893), Derby, c.1880-1883, Collection of Derby Local Studies Library.

[38] Marriage Registration: Thomas Clarke & Sarah Elizabeth Ramsbottom, 2nd Qtr 1844, Basford Registration District, Vol 15 Pg 647, General Register Office (GRO) Index to Births, Marriages & Deaths, from FreeBMD [Accessed 23 Jul 2010].

[39] Bemrose, William (1898) Bow, Chelsea and Derby Porcelain, London: Bemrose & Sons, Ltd., 174pp, courtesy of Archive.org [Accessed 24 Jul 2010].

[40] Image of Crown Derby Imari plate, © George Le Gars and courtesy Wikimedia Commons

[41] Parish Registers of Church Gresley, Derbyshire, 1695-1908, Derbyshire Record Office no: D2112/A/PI/1/1-4,2/1-5,3/1-7,4/1-4,5/1-2, Matlock, Derbyshire, transcribed from microfilm FHL 1785836, LDS Church Family History Library, by Brett Payne, partially available on Church Gresley Parish Pages [Accessed 23 Jul 2010].
 

[42] Parish Registers of Rosliston, Derbyshire, 1758-1812, Derbyshire Record Office, Matlock, Derbyshire, transcribed from microfilm FHL 1042087, LDS Church Family History Library, by Brett Payne [privately held].

[43] Royal Crown Derby, Article from Wikipedia [Accessed 24 Jul 2010].

[44] Anon (2006) Royal Crown Derby, Heirloom Antiques Centre [Accessed 23 Jul 2010].

[45] Image of Old China Works, Derby, in Keys, John (1895) Sketches of Old Derby and Neighbourhood, courtesy of Revolutionary Players, Derby Porcelain: William Duesbury II and Robert Bloor [Accessed 23 Jul 2010].

[46] Bunt, Cyril G.E. (1956) British Potters and Pottery Today, Leigh-on-Sea: F. Lewis, 130pp, Extract as article, “Royal Crown Derby Porcelain Co. Ltd.” on ThePotteries.org [Accessed 23 Jul 2010].

[47] Lloyd, Martin (n.d.) Marks on Derby Porcelain, on Montreal Antiques [Accessed 23 Jul 2010].

[48] Anon (1844) Commission of Lunacy at Hathern, The Derby Mercury, 16 October 1844, 19th Century British Library Newspapers, Courtesy of Gale CENGAGE Learning [Accessed 23 Jul 2010].

[49] Magna Britannia by Lysons

[50] Anon (1879) The Late Mr. Thomas Clarke, The Derby Mercury, 31 December 1879, 19th Century British Library Newspapers, Courtesy of Gale CENGAGE Learning [Accessed 23 Jul 2010].

[51] Twitchett, John (1980) Derby Porcelain, 1748-1848: An Illustrated Guide, Barrie & Jenkins, in Derbyshire Porcelain: Nottingham Road c.1749-1848, by the Derbyshire International Porcelain Society [Accessed 24 Jul 2010].

[52] Image of Bloor plate, Private Collection, Reproduced by permission.

[53] 1851 Census, 27 Sacheverel Street, Derby St Peter , Derbyshire, England, National Archives Ref. HO107/2143/409/27/133, UK Census Collection 1841-1901, from Ancestry.co.uk [Accessed 24 Jul 2010].

[54] Death Registration: Sarah Bloor, 1st Qtr 1852, Derby Registration District, Vol 7b Pg 233, General Register Office (GRO) Index to Births, Marriages & Deaths, from FreeBMD [Accessed 24 Jul 2010].

[55] Anon (1852) Death Notice for Mrs Sarah Bloor, aged 86, in Sacheverel-street, on Thursday last (12 Feb 1852), The Derby Mercury, 18 February 1852, 19th Century British Library Newspapers, Courtesy of Gale CENGAGE Learning [Accessed 24 Jul 2010].

[56] Burton, William (1863) A General History of Porcelain, Volume II, London: Cassell & Company Ltd., courtesy of Archive.org [Accessed 24 Jul 2010].

[57] Anon (1852) Map of the Borough of Derby, surveyed by the Board of Ordnance for the Local Board of Health, (facsimile edition) Derbyshire Archaeological Society, 1980.

[58] Anon (n.d.) History of the Convent in Derby, St Mary’s Church & parish Derby web pages [Accessed 26 Jul 2010].

[59] Jewitt, Llewellynn (1878) The Ceramic Art of Great Britain, Volume II, London: Virtue & Co., Ltd., 569pp, courtesy of Archive.org [Accessed 26 Jul 2010].

[60] Old Ordnance Survey Map: Derby (North), 1899 (O.S. Derbyshire Sheet L.9), republished by Alan Godfrey Maps.

[61] Tacchella, B. (1902) The Derby School Register, 1570-1901, London: Bemrose & Sons, Ltd., 200pp, courtesy of Archive.org [Accessed 26 Jul 2010]

[62] 1861 Census, 1 Pear Tree House, Litchurch, Derby, Derbyshire, England, National Archives Ref. RG9/2505/148/25/142, UK Census Collection 1841-1901, from Ancestry.co.uk [Accessed 26 Jul 2010].

[63] Birth Registration: Frederica Muriel Clarke, 1st Qtr 1883, Derby Registration District, Vol 7b Pg 584, General Register Office (GRO) Index to Births, Marriages & Deaths, from FreeBMD [Accessed 26 Jul 2010].

[64] Kelley, E.R. (ed.) (1881) Kelly’s Directory of Nottinghamshire, Leicestershire & Rutland, & Derbyshire, 1881, London: Kelly & Co., republ. on microfiche by the Derbyshire Family History Society.

[65] 1901 Census, Darley Slade, Belper Road, Derby St Alkmund, Derbyshire, England, National Archives Ref. RG13/3215/19/29/193, UK Census Collection 1841-1901, from Ancestry.co.uk [Accessed 26 Jul 2010].

[66] Anon (1899) Kelly’s Directory of Derbyshire, Nottinghamshire, Leicestershire & Rutland, 1899, London: Kelly’s Directories Limited, courtesy of the University of Leicester’s Historical Directories [Accessed 26 Jul 2010].

[67] 1891 Census, Mason House, Derby Road, Matlock Bath, Derbyshire, England, National Archives Ref. RG12/2775/126/4/17, UK Census Collection 1841-1901, from Ancestry.co.uk [Accessed 26 Jul 2010].

[68] Death Registration: Thomas Clarke, 2nd Qtr 1904, Burton Registration District, Vol 6b Pg 222, General Register Office (GRO) Index to Births, Marriages & Deaths, from FreeBMD [Accessed 26 Jul 2010].

[69] 1911 Census, Radbourne View, Station Rd, Mickleover, Derbyshire, England, National Archives Ref. RG14/1040/16/7/59, England & Wales Census Records 1841-1911, from Find My Past [Accessed 16 Mar 2010].

[70] Photographs of buildings on Nottingham Road and Alice Street, Derby, 18 July 2010, by Nigel Aspdin, reproduced by permission.

[71] Aerial Photograph of Nottingham Road, Derby, 11 June 2006, by Infoetrra Ltd. & Bluesky, from Google Earth [Accessed 26 Jul 2010].

2 comments:

  1. When I grow up, my citations will be as impressive as yours.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Very kind thank you Alex, but I think I may have overdone it a little this time. :-!

    ReplyDelete

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